Practice

I might be a little excited to start building a couple of rods this next weekend. I’ve been looking up tutorials on YouTube trying to get ideas on how to make these rods even more customized. There is a lot of good info out there and some really boring…

I might be a little excited to start building a couple of rods this next weekend. I've been looking up tutorials on YouTube trying to get ideas on how to make these rods even more customized. There is a lot of good info out there and some really boring videos (there are good ones too). I decided to try out a couple of ideas on an old broken blank. Atley took some pictures while I worked on the crosswraps.

I need to take more time at this stage...

Ended up being a cool little design, even if it was done a little haphazardly 

Decided to turn it into a double wrap
Definitely looks like a first attempt, but I kinda like the way it came together. The most important thing is that I learned a lot, so with any luck, the next one will look better. I have a question though, I don't see a lot of these type of wraps on fly rods, is it too much? 

Hope you can get out, be safe, and enjoy nature.

- Kidder

Scouting

Sometimes you have to invest a morning in hopes of finding a new place to fish for the future. This morning I got out with my buddy Ross to try and follow up on a couple of hunches even though this isn’t the ideal time to hit this little freestone type…

Sometimes you have to invest a morning in hopes of finding a new place to fish for the future. This morning I got out with my buddy Ross to try and follow up on a couple of hunches even though this isn't the ideal time to hit this little freestone type streams. First spot required a bit of a hike, but the small canyon and overview of the valley sure made it worth it.


It doesn't look like much, but I've had good days on streams like this


Could be an interesting place to elk hunt...
Next spot looks like it could hold more water but access is going to be a problem. There's always coming in from the top where it's on National Forest, but I was really hoping to be able to get on the water fishing in less time. Oh well, it still looks promising. The next spot wasn't a new spot by any stretch of the imagination, but it was a place where I thought we might be able to get into some trout with the limited time we had. 


The cold sure makes some interesting ice formations on the stream
The fish didn't really want to play, though I did see a beaver and in the first moment thought it was the largest fish ever. Dang beavers. Had one hit all day and had the decent brown on for a few moments before he spit my Cheech Leech. Guess a day like this was a long time coming, but I think it'll lead to some great times this summer. It did feel good to get out after a week of fighting the flu. 

Hope you can get out, be safe, and enjoy nature.


-Kidder



Scouting the Scenic Small Streams along the Natchez Trace Parkway

My brother and I recently spent a rewarding Saturday scouting some of the scenic small streams that are found along the historic Natchez Trace Parkway in Mississippi. We decided to zero in on a few streams that flow along the Choctaw County stretch of the Trace. These streams years ago were a source of food for all those who lived near them. Today those who drive over the many bridges that cross all these streams seldom pay any attention to their beauty and what species of fish they whole. My brothers and I use to fish all these streams as boys when we lived in the area; now the streams are void of any fishing; how times have changed.


We wanted to spend the day to see which streams would be fishable in the summer when all the streams are flowing at their normal level. As you view the images below you will notice that the streams were somewhat stained and showed signs of some high water. Even with an elevation in water level we could see some excellent pocket water and drop offs that will be perfect to fish with the fly rod come summer.

Big Sand the name of this stream was one we selected to fish come summer because of its easy access from its banks. We found some nice pocket holes along its banks.
Little Bywy creek is one of our favorites, and one we fished as boys; notice the inside cut bank, which is where Redeye Bass hang out in the summer months. A dry fly floated along the edge of the bank would get a reaction.

Jenkins Creek pictured here is probably the easier stream to access. There were some fast runs as well as drop offs into deep pools in this creek, which would whole redeye bass, as well as Sun Perch. Casting up stream and letting a dry or nymph float through the deep runs would be deadly.

Little Bywy just on the Trace Parkway look so good I just had to give it a cast or two. I know the bass and sun perch were there, but on this day blue skies and cold temps kept them at bay.

Middle Bywy could be a bit more difficult to fish compared to the other streams because of its high banks. One would need to wade this stream in places to have success. The ideal tackle here would be the Little Jewel 10 ft. rod rigged with a nymph or dry. Catfish are abundant in all these streams and a red worm tipped on a size six hook will yield some nice channel catfish using the Little Jewel. As boys we always used a cane pole and red worms. Our cane pole will be replaced come summer with the Little Jewel and our 7 ½ ft. fly rods. I guess you could say we have moved up in the world of fishing.

 

My brother and I recently spent a rewarding Saturday scouting some of the scenic small streams that are found along the historic Natchez Trace Parkway in Mississippi. We decided to zero in on a few streams that flow along the Choctaw County stretch of the Trace. These streams years ago were a source of food for all those who lived near them. Today those who drive over the many bridges that cross all these streams seldom pay any attention to their beauty and what species of fish they whole. My brothers and I use to fish all these streams as boys when we lived in the area; now the streams are void of any fishing; how times have changed.

We wanted to spend the day to see which streams would be fishable in the summer when all the streams are flowing at their normal level. As you view the images below you will notice that the streams were somewhat stained and showed signs of some high water. Even with an elevation in water level we could see some excellent pocket water and drop offs that will be perfect to fish with the fly rod come summer.
Big Sand the name of this stream was one we selected to fish come summer because of its easy access from its banks. We found some nice pocket holes along its banks.
Little Bywy creek is one of our favorites, and one we fished as boys; notice the inside cut bank, which is where Redeye Bass hang out in the summer months. A dry fly floated along the edge of the bank would get a reaction.
Jenkins Creek pictured here is probably the easier stream to access. There were some fast runs as well as drop offs into deep pools in this creek, which would whole redeye bass, as well as Sun Perch. Casting up stream and letting a dry or nymph float through the deep runs would be deadly.
Little Bywy just on the Trace Parkway look so good I just had to give it a cast or two. I know the bass and sun perch were there, but on this day blue skies and cold temps kept them at bay.
Middle Bywy could be a bit more difficult to fish compared to the other streams because of its high banks. One would need to wade this stream in places to have success. The ideal tackle here would be the Little Jewel 10 ft. rod rigged with a nymph or dry. Catfish are abundant in all these streams and a red worm tipped on a size six hook will yield some nice channel catfish using the Little Jewel. As boys we always used a cane pole and red worms. Our cane pole will be replaced come summer with the Little Jewel and our 7 ½ ft. fly rods. I guess you could say we have moved up in the world of fishing.