Filling Up

Lately I’ve been trying to catch up on my neglected tying. Sometime in December I put together a list of all the flies I’d like to have in my boxes before the summer hit. Well, summer’s just around the corner and I haven’t checked too many off my list….

Lately I've been trying to catch up on my neglected tying. Sometime in December I put together a list of all the flies I'd like to have in my boxes before the summer hit. Well, summer's just around the corner and I haven't checked too many off my list. Tonight's project was yellow & orange Stimulators.


Yellow/Orange

Orange/Orange



Half a dozen down
 I'll keep after it, but it definitely won't be cutting into my fishing time! Hope you can get out and enjoy the water.


- Kidder

The Bulls are Running!!!

 

The bulls I am really referring to is the big bull bluegills on Walker County Lake. I couldn’t have asked for a better morning to continue to work on my bluegill quest. This morning was unusual in that there was virtually no wind for at least three hours, which made for some fantastic on and off surface action.

 




First gill of the morning on the Black Super Nymph, which is lodged in his throat; I started with a popper but no takers.  The fish were extremely weary and I had to keep the boat some distance from the bank to keep from scaring the bigger fish. This lake is fished quite heavy this time of year and the bigger fish tend to know if danger is approaching. Lighter presentations with lighter flies work best for a while as I worked the banks.   

Another counter for the quest with the nymph inhaled. I lost numbers of fish today simply because I wasn’t keeping a tight line on the fish. These fish usually bed in water 4 to 6 feet deep, and once hooked they make a bee line for deep water, so stripping line as fast as one can will ensure landing the fish, otherwise you take a chance losing a good bull bluegill.  

This bass eyed the dark green black legged Betts popper a little to close. I landed numbers of bass as I work the steep banks. I had two combos with me today, my 3 and 4 weight, both 8 ½ ft. Equal numbers was taken on both combos.

 

As the Super Nymph faded, I went back to my popper, which was a black legged faded black body Betts.  Sorry I don’t have an image of this popper, which was lost on a break off in a brush pile. I ended the morning with the black legged chartreuse.

The best of the best for the morning; I will count 8 towards my quest which makes me 41 away.

 

 

 

 
  

 

 

 

 




 

The bulls I am really referring to is the big bull bluegills on Walker County Lake. I couldn’t have asked for a better morning to continue to work on my bluegill quest. This morning was unusual in that there was virtually no wind for at least three hours, which made for some fantastic on and off surface action.

 


First gill of the morning on the Black Super Nymph, which is lodged in his throat; I started with a popper but no takers.  The fish were extremely weary and I had to keep the boat some distance from the bank to keep from scaring the bigger fish. This lake is fished quite heavy this time of year and the bigger fish tend to know if danger is approaching. Lighter presentations with lighter flies work best for a while as I worked the banks.   
Another counter for the quest with the nymph inhaled. I lost numbers of fish today simply because I wasn’t keeping a tight line on the fish. These fish usually bed in water 4 to 6 feet deep, and once hooked they make a bee line for deep water, so stripping line as fast as one can will ensure landing the fish, otherwise you take a chance losing a good bull bluegill.  
This bass eyed the dark green black legged Betts popper a little to close. I landed numbers of bass as I work the steep banks. I had two combos with me today, my 3 and 4 weight, both 8 ½ ft. Equal numbers was taken on both combos.
 

As the Super Nymph faded, I went back to my popper, which was a black legged faded black body Betts.  Sorry I don’t have an image of this popper, which was lost on a break off in a brush pile. I ended the morning with the black legged chartreuse.
The best of the best for the morning; I will count 8 towards my quest which makes me 41 away.

 
 

 
 
  
 
 
 

 



Mod. Hare's Ear

One of my go-to flies to use for a dropper is my Mod. Hare’s Ear and I thought some of you’d like to know what the crap I’ve been talking about. I’m not claiming this to be some kind of a break though fly, in fact I’m sure several others have probably …

One of my go-to flies to use for a dropper is my Mod. Hare's Ear and I thought some of you'd like to know what the crap I've been talking about. I'm not claiming this to be some kind of a break though fly, in fact I'm sure several others have probably "invented" this fly too, but here's my take on it.

Hook: Allen N203, #10-16
Thread:Uni-Thread 6/0
Rib:Small Ultra Wire, gold
Shellback:Pheasant Tail 


I put 4 wraps of lead behind the bead, lay down a thread base and attach the rib wire.

Then dub a tapered body to about a bead and a halfs worth shy of the bead.

Tie in 7-10 pheasant tail fibers at the thorax. Make sure you have enough hanging left to form a tail one body's length.

Use the rib wire to lash down the pheasant fibers on top of the body. Then barber-pole the wire forward to create the rib.

Secure the wire and helicopter it out (or cut it, if that's what you're more comfortable with).

Dub the thorax heavy and pull the pheasant fibers over to form the wingcase. I've added legs of pheasant tail fibers at this point, but normally I don't (it just doesn't seem to make much of a difference). Just whip finish and it's ready to fish.

It's a pattern that you can tie up a bunch in a hurry. I seem to use a lot of 'em in #12s and #14s.

Works nice in other colors too.


 Tie up a bunch & get out there and enjoy the water. I know I'm itching to.

- Kidder