Flies Used Flies Replaced

How many flies does one use on any given outing on their favorite stream or tailrace? 5 or 6 flies is tops for me, which got me to thinking the other day do I really need all these flies I carry in my fly box? I had flies in the fly box that I hadn’t used in years and some had never touched the waters surface. So to make space for the new flies I was going to add I starting culling those I seldom use. Take note of the words “fly box” because that is the only box I use now days when fly fishing.
This little Orvis metal fly box 2 ½ by 3 ½ has all the flies that I will use on any given day on the water. It fits easily in my small chest pack that is lightweight and compact as well. The older I get the more I want to eliminate weight when wading and standing for long periods of time in 55 to 60 degree water. Notice the difference in the amount of flies in the box before culling and after. 
Given the fact I had a well organized fly box and the Sipsey Tailrace was fishing some better than a couple of weeks ago; I decided to test the waters with some of the newer flies that I had added to the box. I was met with cloudy skies and of course high humidity and lots of fog on the water surface. As I waded into place at access 5 I could barely see the surface film for the fog coming off the water. I decided to cast one of my new flies a size 18 Black Drake dry in the direction of some trout feeding near where I was standing. I got a hit after a few cast and thought I was in for some rapid top action. To my surprise, just as quick as the surface activity started it ended I surmised I was fishing the tail end of the surface feed. 
With the generation schedule changed I had to use my time wisely so after surface activity slowed I moved on up the gorge. I replaced the Drake with a fly Alan at Small Stream Reflections sent me sometime back. I thought today would be a good time to give it a try. I tied on the Salars Nemesis tight lining it across a wide section that had some fast water in the middle and slower water on both sides. As the fly drifted from the edge of the slow to fast water I got a take and lost it just as quick; poor concentration and slow hook set, not a good combo. I kept working the Salarsslowly with some short jerks mixed in when a trout nailed it in the middle of the swing, strong hook set and the trout was in the net!!
Today was one of those trips where one fly pattern didn’t produce on a consistent basis. In fact that can be the norm on the Sipsey at times. These trout see a lot of the same flies in the upper section of the tailrace so it’s good to show them a little something different. My next stop was the log section in deep water where the better trout hang out below the submerged logs. I decided to tie on the Seal Leech to fish this section. This is a fly that David Knapp gave me some years ago to work in deeper water. I fish this fly a little unconventional by casting it down stream and working it back slowly against the current. As I work the fly I let it pause in the current and flutter, usually during the pause is when I get the hit. Today this type retrieve help me land a couple of stocker trout just above the logs. I was hoping for the bigger trout but I will take what this section gives up.
I ended today’s trip at the Guide Hole, which is where the guys at the fly shop bring a lot of their clients to fish the slow water in this section. This part of the tailrace has a small seam with some fast current above some slower water below. I think this little seam is one of the best areas in the guide hole section. I’ve landed some nice rainbow in this little seam. I’ve had much better luck in this area using a small nymph with an indicator. I choose a red size 16 Copper John to drift through the fast water and hopefully watch the indicator sink quickly. It didn’t happen quickly but I did manage to land one more rainbow using the little nymph. All the flies used for today’s trip were some that I had never used here before and some that I hadn’t used in years. As I was leaving at access 5 the trout were into the sipping mode, so I stopped to try to get a take with no success. I’m still having problems getting hits when the trout are feeding in this manner. I suspect they are feeding on tiny midges, but color and actual size is still a puzzle. I am thinking of purchasing a stomach pump—-any suggestions are welcome!!
 


How many flies does one use on any given outing on their favorite stream or tailrace? 5 or 6 flies is tops for me, which got me to thinking the other day do I really need all these flies I carry in my fly box? I had flies in the fly box that I hadn't used in years and some had never touched the waters surface. So to make space for the new flies I was going to add I starting culling those I seldom use. Take note of the words “fly box” because that is the only box I use now days when fly fishing.
This little Orvis metal fly box 2 ½ by 3 ½ has all the flies that I will use on any given day on the water. It fits easily in my small chest pack that is lightweight and compact as well. The older I get the more I want to eliminate weight when wading and standing for long periods of time in 55 to 60 degree water. Notice the difference in the amount of flies in the box before culling and after. 
Given the fact I had a well organized fly box and the Sipsey Tailrace was fishing some better than a couple of weeks ago; I decided to test the waters with some of the newer flies that I had added to the box. I was met with cloudy skies and of course high humidity and lots of fog on the water surface. As I waded into place at access 5 I could barely see the surface film for the fog coming off the water. I decided to cast one of my new flies a size 18 Black Drake dry in the direction of some trout feeding near where I was standing. I got a hit after a few cast and thought I was in for some rapid top action. To my surprise, just as quick as the surface activity started it ended I surmised I was fishing the tail end of the surface feed. 
With the generation schedule changed I had to use my time wisely so after surface activity slowed I moved on up the gorge. I replaced the Drake with a fly Alan at Small Stream Reflections sent me sometime back. I thought today would be a good time to give it a try. I tied on the Salars Nemesis tight lining it across a wide section that had some fast water in the middle and slower water on both sides. As the fly drifted from the edge of the slow to fast water I got a take and lost it just as quick; poor concentration and slow hook set, not a good combo. I kept working the Salarsslowly with some short jerks mixed in when a trout nailed it in the middle of the swing, strong hook set and the trout was in the net!!
Today was one of those trips where one fly pattern didn't produce on a consistent basis. In fact that can be the norm on the Sipsey at times. These trout see a lot of the same flies in the upper section of the tailrace so it's good to show them a little something different. My next stop was the log section in deep water where the better trout hang out below the submerged logs. I decided to tie on the Seal Leech to fish this section. This is a fly that David Knapp gave me some years ago to work in deeper water. I fish this fly a little unconventional by casting it down stream and working it back slowly against the current. As I work the fly I let it pause in the current and flutter, usually during the pause is when I get the hit. Today this type retrieve help me land a couple of stocker trout just above the logs. I was hoping for the bigger trout but I will take what this section gives up.
I ended today's trip at the Guide Hole, which is where the guys at the fly shop bring a lot of their clients to fish the slow water in this section. This part of the tailrace has a small seam with some fast current above some slower water below. I think this little seam is one of the best areas in the guide hole section. I've landed some nice rainbow in this little seam. I've had much better luck in this area using a small nymph with an indicator. I choose a red size 16 Copper John to drift through the fast water and hopefully watch the indicator sink quickly. It didn't happen quickly but I did manage to land one more rainbow using the little nymph. All the flies used for today's trip were some that I had never used here before and some that I hadn't used in years. As I was leaving at access 5 the trout were into the sipping mode, so I stopped to try to get a take with no success. I'm still having problems getting hits when the trout are feeding in this manner. I suspect they are feeding on tiny midges, but color and actual size is still a puzzle. I am thinking of purchasing a stomach pump----any suggestions are welcome!!
 

Fly Fishing the Elk River

Nothing like fishing with family, and Friday was another opportunity for me to cast some flies with my son-in-law and my grandson Bryson. He has been wanting to make a flow trip with us for the past couple of years, and Friday we made it happen. We mee…


Nothing like fishing with family, and Friday was another opportunity for me to cast some flies with my son-in-law and my grandson Bryson. He has been wanting to make a flow trip with us for the past couple of years, and Friday we made it happen. We meet David Perry our guide at the rivers edge below Tims Ford Dam at 7AM. I have fished with David many times before and know that he will always put us on trout. The Elk is a tailrace that is stocked once a month with rainbow and browns. B.T and I have fished it from the bank at the dam a number of times, with lots of other fly fishermen doing same; to escape the crowd the boat is the way to hit all the honey holes.
Pops and B.T. was really pound of the way Bryson handled the trip considering we were on the water fishing for 5 hours and then another 2 hours to get to the take out area. One of many trout that Bryson would land before the trip was over.
My only brown trout for the trip, which was my best trout of the day. B.T. and I spent a lot of the trip letting Bryson land a lot of the trout we hooked. This trip was about Bryson experiencing the thrill of trout fishing and he's already looking forward to our next outing.
One happy little guy; I can't begin to tell you guys how much fun it is to enter act with all three of my grandchildren at the ages of 4, 6, and soon to be 9 year old Bryson. Sometimes I wish they didn't have to go up so fast!!!

Landing Spotted Bass

Some of my best fishing trips are with my son, son-in-law, daughter, and grandchildren. Today I spent some quality time fishing Smith Lake with my son Jason, who is home for a week. 

We left the house at 4:30 AM and started casting the big size 4 Boggle Bug popper close to 5 AM. At this time of day there is practically no humidity and no heat. In fact the air was a cool 75 degrees. Daylight fishing is the norm for me this time of the year mainly because of the heat and humidity. 
A beautiful sunrise was one of the rewards that we encountered as we left the launch at 5 AM. The other reward was the banner morning we had landing some quality Spotted Bass along the huge rock walls located on the lake.
This Largemouth Bass was the only one landed during the early morning trip. There is a big difference in the fighting power of the Largemouth Bass verses the Spotted Bass. The Spotted Bass is one heroic fighter!!!
One of many Spotted Bass which exploded time after time on the Boggle as Jason worked the popper inches away from one of the many rock walls we fished early. The face of this popper makes a popping sound that really gets the attention of feeding bass. Jason was using a bass bug line on his 6 weight fast taper 9 ft. Sage fly rod. The bass bug line made casting the big popper a breeze.



The bluegill didn’t get left out on this outing. The Wiggle Tail nymph was used to land this nice size female gill. In fact all four colors of the Wiggle Tail got the attention of the bulls and females. I didn’t count any the bluegill on this trip, because Jason landed most of the counters. This is the same nymph that Jason used to hook the trout he landed on Fuller Lake.
 

Some of my best fishing trips are with my son, son-in-law, daughter, and grandchildren. Today I spent some quality time fishing Smith Lake with my son Jason, who is home for a week. 

We left the house at 4:30 AM and started casting the big size 4 Boggle Bug popper close to 5 AM. At this time of day there is practically no humidity and no heat. In fact the air was a cool 75 degrees. Daylight fishing is the norm for me this time of the year mainly because of the heat and humidity. 
A beautiful sunrise was one of the rewards that we encountered as we left the launch at 5 AM. The other reward was the banner morning we had landing some quality Spotted Bass along the huge rock walls located on the lake.
This Largemouth Bass was the only one landed during the early morning trip. There is a big difference in the fighting power of the Largemouth Bass verses the Spotted Bass. The Spotted Bass is one heroic fighter!!!
One of many Spotted Bass which exploded time after time on the Boggle as Jason worked the popper inches away from one of the many rock walls we fished early. The face of this popper makes a popping sound that really gets the attention of feeding bass. Jason was using a bass bug line on his 6 weight fast taper 9 ft. Sage fly rod. The bass bug line made casting the big popper a breeze.




The bluegill didn’t get left out on this outing. The Wiggle Tail nymph was used to land this nice size female gill. In fact all four colors of the Wiggle Tail got the attention of the bulls and females. I didn’t count any the bluegill on this trip, because Jason landed most of the counters. This is the same nymph that Jason used to hook the trout he landed on Fuller Lake.